Look what comes up in the apple newsstand under travel/regional! Our FREE app! Download yours today!

Look what comes up in the apple newsstand under travel/regional! Our FREE app! Download yours today!

The painting hangs next to the front door. Everyone who enters Bobby Chenman’s Virginia Beach home sees it: a vivid watercolor of blues and greens with two daring surfers riding the same giant wave.
It’s called, simply, Yokohama Bay, after the spot in Hawaii captured in the scene.
In 1964, a 14-year-old Chenman had torn out the centerfold of a surfing magazine and walked down 23rd Street to a portrait artist he remembers only as “Mrs. Jefferson.” For the low price of $15, she reproduced the picture – and improved upon it. Read the rest of the story here: http://distinctionhr.com/2014/08/bobby-chenman/
Download our FREE iPad app w/ FREE TRIAL and our current issue for FREE here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/distinction-magazine/id907014559?ls=1&mt=8

The painting hangs next to the front door. Everyone who enters Bobby Chenman’s Virginia Beach home sees it: a vivid watercolor of blues and greens with two daring surfers riding the same giant wave.

It’s called, simply, Yokohama Bay, after the spot in Hawaii captured in the scene.

In 1964, a 14-year-old Chenman had torn out the centerfold of a surfing magazine and walked down 23rd Street to a portrait artist he remembers only as “Mrs. Jefferson.” For the low price of $15, she reproduced the picture – and improved upon it. 

Read the rest of the story here: http://distinctionhr.com/2014/08/bobby-chenman/

Download our FREE iPad app w/ FREE TRIAL and our current issue for FREE here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/distinction-magazine/id907014559?ls=1&mt=8

southoftheprintline:

Special cocktail for Distinction event tomorrow night! #distinction #party #loveva #specialnight #757 #luxuryhome

Look for photo posts from the party tomorrow night and Friday!  if you are at the event, take pictures and tag them on Facebook or Instagram with #distinctionevent and we might just share them out!

southoftheprintline:

Special cocktail for Distinction event tomorrow night! #distinction #party #loveva #specialnight #757 #luxuryhome

Look for photo posts from the party tomorrow night and Friday!  if you are at the event, take pictures and tag them on Facebook or Instagram with #distinctionevent and we might just share them out!

southoftheprintline:

Distinction August 2014 Review!  Creative Director Jennifer Fenner walks us through the mag!  #distinctionhr #loveva #magazine #debue #luxurylifestyle

Our next issue is nearly complete! Here is a behind the scenes photo for you.

southoftheprintline:

Distinction August 2014 Review! Creative Director Jennifer Fenner walks us through the mag! #distinctionhr #loveva #magazine #debue #luxurylifestyle

Our next issue is nearly complete! Here is a behind the scenes photo for you.

Recently we caught up with, Hampton Roads Sneaker King, Phillip Wilson from our “Sole Searching” article. Wilson’s original tally was 884 pairs of sneakers, now he is up to 1089 pairs and growing. He also had part of our article framed! Read the original article here:http://www.distinctionhr.com/2012/08/sole-searching/ 

Distinction Magazine has once again won first place, in Niche Product, from the Society for Features Journalism Excellence-in-Features Awards!Judge’s comments: “This magazine might be about Hampton Roads’ high-end crowd, but it has much to offer the newspaper’s entire readership. Profiles have insight and personality; home features make you want to redecorate; travel features give a feeling that it’s time to hit the road. Photography and design are bright, sharp and elegant.”

Distinction Magazine has once again won first place, in Niche Product, from the Society for Features Journalism Excellence-in-Features Awards!

Judge’s comments: “This magazine might be about Hampton Roads’ high-end crowd, but it has much to offer the newspaper’s entire readership. Profiles have insight and personality; home features make you want to redecorate; travel features give a feeling that it’s time to hit the road. Photography and design are bright, sharp and elegant.”

DISCOVERING MY HOMETOWN
by Mary Architzel Westbrookphotograph by Roberto Westbrook
Several summers ago, my brother-in-law brought his girlfriend home for a long weekend. As we sat together along Chic’s Beach, I was falling into that deep, salt-tinged stupor that enfolds you toward the end of a beach day when Rebecca pointed toward the bay and frowned. “It’s such a pretty view,” she said. “Too bad that ugly thing is spoiling it.” The Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel isn’t a “thing,” we told her. It’s an engineering marvel. With a shrug, Rebecca returned to her magazine. Though I adored her, I felt indignant: What was she thinking? Who doesn’t admire the Bay Bridge-Tunnel?
Later, I was surprised by how much her offhand comment irked me. After all, since returning to Tidewater a couple years before I’d hardly been a cheerleader for the region. When friends from bigger cities came to visit, I’d drive them into downtown Norfolk reluctantly and sigh: “Don’t blink. You’ll miss it.” Or, as we inched along the bleakest stretch of Virginia Beach Boulevard, I’d grimace. “Terrible, isn’t it?”
For a long time, I was self-conscious about this area, though we started off on good terms. When my family arrived in Virginia Beach, I was 12 and fed up with moving; at Great Neck Middle School, I purposely befriended local kids, people who didn’t keep time by Navy deployments. After school, I’d sidle up to their kitchen counters and find myself in an alternate universe: grandparents who lived down the street, bedrooms inhabited since preschool, furniture custom-built for a specific space. Field hockey sticks in every garage. The place dazzled me.
The love affair eventually wore thin. By the time I graduated high school, I was itching to see the world, and so I did. After college, I landed a writing gig that sent me to Bogotá and Amsterdam. In my 20s, my husband, a photographer, and I spent nine months working in and traveling through South America. We made our way to the farthest end of the continent, Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego, and explored icebergs and mountain trails. We hopscotched our way along small beach towns in Brazil, eating dinners freshly plucked from the ocean next to fishermen in pocket-sized family restaurants.
When I moved back to Tidewater after that adventure, this time to Norfolk, I pointed my nose skyward. The strip malls! The tunnels! The teeth-rattling jets overhead! They offended my newfound worldliness. I’d seen so much; what did this place have to offer?
Still, something about my attitude rang false, even then. If I disliked it, why had I come back? I was an unencumbered adult, capable of going almost any place else; yet there I was – complaining about things, poking fun.
The truth is that when I wasn’t moaning about what the area lacked, I was happy to be here. Other cities I’d visited were more glamorous, but they didn’t have my haunts: a decades-old diner at the Oceanfront, the winding paths in First Landing State Park (which, to me, will always be Seashore), the perfect picnic spot along the Chesapeake Bay. I found new favorites in Norfolk, hidden parks and cobblestoned streets, along with small businesses and shops, some of them owned by friends. That’s another thing about Tidewater: We may be a major metro area but we have a small-town feel – I rarely make it through the grocery store without running into someone I know. You can make a difference here. You can matter. There is a sexiness to traveling, jetting into a place, hanging around for a little bit, but a sweetness to coming home and rediscovering an area, loving it.
Over the course of two decades, I’ve felt both desperate to fit into Tidewater, and desperate to leave it – which according to most coming-of-age novels I’ve read and every Bruce Springsteen song ever written, is just about what a good hometown should be. Once I was ready to settle down, I was also ready to come home.
That day on Chic’s Beach made me realize, though, that having a hometown is like having a kid brother. He may bug you, but he’s your brother. No one else gets to say a word against him. I could make fun of empty downtown streets or gritty strip malls, but an outsider, even an outsider I loved, couldn’t call any part of my home ugly.
And, after all, the Bay Bridge-Tunnel, and the places it leads you to here, are beautiful. Last year, after a two-week summer vacation in the Northeast, my husband, 20-month-old son and I drove down the Eastern Shore, ready to be done with the long drive. When we finally caught sight of the white shoreline paralleling Shore Drive, I let go of a breath I didn’t know I was holding. It was like a cork bursting out of a Champagne bottle on New Year’s. We’re home now, we cheered, as our car rumbled over the bridge. We’re home.

DISCOVERING MY HOMETOWN

by Mary Architzel Westbrook
photograph by Roberto Westbrook

Several summers ago, my brother-in-law brought his girlfriend home for a long weekend. As we sat together along Chic’s Beach, I was falling into that deep, salt-tinged stupor that enfolds you toward the end of a beach day when Rebecca pointed toward the bay and frowned. “It’s such a pretty view,” she said. “Too bad that ugly thing is spoiling it.” The Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel isn’t a “thing,” we told her. It’s an engineering marvel. With a shrug, Rebecca returned to her magazine. Though I adored her, I felt indignant: What was she thinking? Who doesn’t admire the Bay Bridge-Tunnel?

Later, I was surprised by how much her offhand comment irked me. After all, since returning to Tidewater a couple years before I’d hardly been a cheerleader for the region. When friends from bigger cities came to visit, I’d drive them into downtown Norfolk reluctantly and sigh: “Don’t blink. You’ll miss it.” Or, as we inched along the bleakest stretch of Virginia Beach Boulevard, I’d grimace. “Terrible, isn’t it?”

For a long time, I was self-conscious about this area, though we started off on good terms. When my family arrived in Virginia Beach, I was 12 and fed up with moving; at Great Neck Middle School, I purposely befriended local kids, people who didn’t keep time by Navy deployments. After school, I’d sidle up to their kitchen counters and find myself in an alternate universe: grandparents who lived down the street, bedrooms inhabited since preschool, furniture custom-built for a specific space. Field hockey sticks in every garage. The place dazzled me.

The love affair eventually wore thin. By the time I graduated high school, I was itching to see the world, and so I did. After college, I landed a writing gig that sent me to Bogotá and Amsterdam. In my 20s, my husband, a photographer, and I spent nine months working in and traveling through South America. We made our way to the farthest end of the continent, Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego, and explored icebergs and mountain trails. We hopscotched our way along small beach towns in Brazil, eating dinners freshly plucked from the ocean next to fishermen in pocket-sized family restaurants.

When I moved back to Tidewater after that adventure, this time to Norfolk, I pointed my nose skyward. The strip malls! The tunnels! The teeth-rattling jets overhead! They offended my newfound worldliness. I’d seen so much; what did this place have to offer?

Still, something about my attitude rang false, even then. If I disliked it, why had I come back? I was an unencumbered adult, capable of going almost any place else; yet there I was – complaining about things, poking fun.

The truth is that when I wasn’t moaning about what the area lacked, I was happy to be here. Other cities I’d visited were more glamorous, but they didn’t have my haunts: a decades-old diner at the Oceanfront, the winding paths in First Landing State Park (which, to me, will always be Seashore), the perfect picnic spot along the Chesapeake Bay. I found new favorites in Norfolk, hidden parks and cobblestoned streets, along with small businesses and shops, some of them owned by friends. That’s another thing about Tidewater: We may be a major metro area but we have a small-town feel – I rarely make it through the grocery store without running into someone I know. You can make a difference here. You can matter. There is a sexiness to traveling, jetting into a place, hanging around for a little bit, but a sweetness to coming home and rediscovering an area, loving it.

Over the course of two decades, I’ve felt both desperate to fit into Tidewater, and desperate to leave it – which according to most coming-of-age novels I’ve read and every Bruce Springsteen song ever written, is just about what a good hometown should be. Once I was ready to settle down, I was also ready to come home.

That day on Chic’s Beach made me realize, though, that having a hometown is like having a kid brother. He may bug you, but he’s your brother. No one else gets to say a word against him. I could make fun of empty downtown streets or gritty strip malls, but an outsider, even an outsider I loved, couldn’t call any part of my home ugly.

And, after all, the Bay Bridge-Tunnel, and the places it leads you to here, are beautiful. Last year, after a two-week summer vacation in the Northeast, my husband, 20-month-old son and I drove down the Eastern Shore, ready to be done with the long drive. When we finally caught sight of the white shoreline paralleling Shore Drive, I let go of a breath I didn’t know I was holding. It was like a cork bursting out of a Champagne bottle on New Year’s. We’re home now, we cheered, as our car rumbled over the bridge. We’re home.

Ancient Greeks and Romans believed;it could help prevent bee stings and ease ailments. In modern times, it often lands on top-10 lists of aphrodisiac foods. So why do so many people avoid asparagus, even at its peak in late spring and early summer.
One reason: Cooking it too long, especially if the stalks are already limp, results in a mushy mess.
“That’s the only way a lot of people have had it, and it’s disgusting,” says Wendy Jo Peterson, a registered dietitian, culinary nutritionist and author. “They need to try it al dente, with that great crunch.”
At the grocery store, don’t concentrate on color (asparagus can be green, purple or white) but look for firm stalks with bottoms that don’t appear dried out or ashy, says Peterson, who is based in San Diego and has a residence in Virginia Beach. At home, trim the bottoms and place them in an inch of water, then cover the spears with a plastic bag.
And rather than boiling, blanch: Cook asparagus in boiling water for about two minutes, followed by a 30-second soak in ice water. Or wrap baby stalks in prosciutto or bacon and bake for 10 or 15 minutes at
400 degrees (often a picky-kid favorite).
Growing asparagus takes patience, as seeds or year-old crowns planted in early spring likely won’t be ready for two or three years. The reward is a hardy perennial that can tolerate cold and dry spells and produce for 15-plus years, especially in plots with full sun and good drainage, according to the Virginia Cooperative Extension. Find the recipe here.
So shoot, asparagus haters – give it another chance?

Ancient Greeks and Romans believed;it could help prevent bee stings and ease ailments. In modern times, it often lands on top-10 lists of aphrodisiac foods. So why do so many people avoid asparagus, even at its peak in late spring and early summer.

One reason: Cooking it too long, especially if the stalks are already limp, results in a mushy mess.

“That’s the only way a lot of people have had it, and it’s disgusting,” says Wendy Jo Peterson, a registered dietitian, culinary nutritionist and author. “They need to try it al dente, with that great crunch.”

At the grocery store, don’t concentrate on color (asparagus can be green, purple or white) but look for firm stalks with bottoms that don’t appear dried out or ashy, says Peterson, who is based in San Diego and has a residence in Virginia Beach. At home, trim the bottoms and place them in an inch of water, then cover the spears with a plastic bag.

And rather than boiling, blanch: Cook asparagus in boiling water for about two minutes, followed by a 30-second soak in ice water. Or wrap baby stalks in prosciutto or bacon and bake for 10 or 15 minutes at

400 degrees (often a picky-kid favorite).

Growing asparagus takes patience, as seeds or year-old crowns planted in early spring likely won’t be ready for two or three years. The reward is a hardy perennial that can tolerate cold and dry spells and produce for 15-plus years, especially in plots with full sun and good drainage, according to the Virginia Cooperative Extension. Find the recipe here.

So shoot, asparagus haters – give it another chance?

Weary of chasing profits, Patrick Ryan yearned to transform the neglected into the beautiful and useful. As he reclaimed old wood, he reclaimed his life.
For most of a decade, the road was his escape. By the time Patrick Ryan marked his 30th birthday, the former Virginia Beach surfer kid had become a burned-out businessman. His regional sales trips at least gave him a chance to get out of the office, away from the numbing glow of a computer screen and onto the open road. Read the rest of his story here.

Weary of chasing profits, Patrick Ryan yearned to transform the neglected into the beautiful and useful. As he reclaimed old wood, he reclaimed his life.

For most of a decade, the road was his escape. By the time Patrick Ryan marked his 30th birthday, the former Virginia Beach surfer kid had become a burned-out businessman. His regional sales trips at least gave him a chance to get out of the office, away from the numbing glow of a computer screen and onto the open road. Read the rest of his story here.

Hello Friends!
I have a particular love of and awe for people who make things with their hands – I think in large part because I am of little use with mine.  In this issue of Distinction we feature several such artisans, makers of the sturdy and the beautiful. 
There’s Patrick Ryan, who walked away from a secure and successful business job to give old barns another chance at life, as furniture. You’ll be able to see Ryan’s work – which he’s been doing for less than a year – soon at Back Bay Brewing Co.’s Norfolk 
Avenue tasting room. 
On the other end of the experience spectrum is Bill Frierson, a longtime surfer who has hand-shaped thousands of surfboards – at least 18,000 of them, he figures. He synthesizes the art and science of shaping in his mind; there’s no need to crunch numbers. As Frierson looks back on 50 years of work, he knows that this may be his last in this business. But he also knows it’s been a hell of a run, and hopes others will carry on his traditions.
Another such master is Nol Putnam, whose 80-year-old hands are scarred from the half of his life that he has spent standing at a forge, handling 2,200-degree iron, hammering, hammering, hammering.
We also feature two family units who make things together: Kimberly and Derek Munn, a couple who do beautiful hand lettering and screen printing together as Maple & Belmont. Her whimsy and his structure complement each other to great effect. And we take you to McKinnon and Harris in Richmond, where siblings Anne and Will Massie carry out the lifelong love of furniture that started with their grandmothers. 
In this issue you’ll also find two people who have boomeranged back to Hampton Roads. There’s businessman Randy Webb who, after years of commuting to New York City, came back to the hometown that his family had already known for generations. And there’s our essayist, Mary Architzel Westbrook, a military kid who viewed hometowns with curiosity and envy. She came back after years traipsing across the globe, and now defends her home fiercely against criticism. 
We also have a fun and light fashion spread, shot high up in downtown Norfolk, featuring the light pastels of the season. And for men, we have a great assortment of lively socks.
This issue offers plenty for foodies, too; we have recipes for three spring favorites, and we take you to Venture, a restaurant in Hampton whose menu is as delicious as it is creative.
There’s so much more inside. As always, please let us know what you think, and thanks for reading. 
- Judy Le, judy@distinctionhr.com- John Fall, john@distinctionhr.com
www.distinctionhr.com

Hello Friends!

I have a particular love of and awe for people who make things with their hands – I think in large part because I am of little use with mine.  In this issue of Distinction we feature several such artisans, makers of the sturdy and the beautiful. 

There’s Patrick Ryan, who walked away from a secure and successful business job to give old barns another chance at life, as furniture. You’ll be able to see Ryan’s work – which he’s been doing for less than a year – soon at Back Bay Brewing Co.’s Norfolk 

Avenue tasting room. 

On the other end of the experience spectrum is Bill Frierson, a longtime surfer who has hand-shaped thousands of surfboards – at least 18,000 of them, he figures. He synthesizes the art and science of shaping in his mind; there’s no need to crunch numbers. As Frierson looks back on 50 years of work, he knows that this may be his last in this business. But he also knows it’s been a hell of a run, and hopes others will carry on his traditions.

Another such master is Nol Putnam, whose 80-year-old hands are scarred from the half of his life that he has spent standing at a forge, handling 2,200-degree iron, hammering, hammering, hammering.

We also feature two family units who make things together: Kimberly and Derek Munn, a couple who do beautiful hand lettering and screen printing together as Maple & Belmont. Her whimsy and his structure complement each other to great effect. And we take you to McKinnon and Harris in Richmond, where siblings Anne and Will Massie carry out the lifelong love of furniture that started with their grandmothers. 

In this issue you’ll also find two people who have boomeranged back to Hampton Roads. There’s businessman Randy Webb who, after years of commuting to New York City, came back to the hometown that his family had already known for generations. And there’s our essayist, Mary Architzel Westbrook, a military kid who viewed hometowns with curiosity and envy. She came back after years traipsing across the globe, and now defends her home fiercely against criticism. 

We also have a fun and light fashion spread, shot high up in downtown Norfolk, featuring the light pastels of the season. And for men, we have a great assortment of lively socks.

This issue offers plenty for foodies, too; we have recipes for three spring favorites, and we take you to Venture, a restaurant in Hampton whose menu is as delicious as it is creative.

There’s so much more inside. As always, please let us know what you think, and thanks for reading. 

- Judy Le, judy@distinctionhr.com
- John Fall, john@distinctionhr.com

www.distinctionhr.com

Here is the new cover to our summer issue due out this Sunday! We can’t wait to share all the stories inside. More to come! 

Here is the new cover to our summer issue due out this Sunday! We can’t wait to share all the stories inside. More to come! 

Working on music and editing a video for our May 12 issue. Can’t wait to share!

Working on music and editing a video for our May 12 issue. Can’t wait to share!

Looking to get Distinction for your tablet? Our ebook is up on our store now! http://Click here to seeClibit.ly/1geucMi  #hrva #ebook

Looking to get Distinction for your tablet? Our ebook is up on our store now!

We want to thank everyone who entered our Get Hooked Up Fly Fishing contest! We had more than 4400 entries. Check back here at 5:30 to find out the winner! #flyfishing #hrva

We want to thank everyone who entered our Get Hooked Up Fly Fishing contest! We had more than 4400 entries. Check back here at 5:30 to find out the winner! #flyfishing #hrva

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